Does the success of historical fiction benefit or threaten academic history? – Cora Kaplan

LECTURE

Speaker: Cora Kaplan (Queen Mary University of London)

Cora Kaplan examines the success of historical fiction as a benefit and threat to academic history through a feminist standpoint.  Kaplan suggests that one way to look at this issue is through the ‘politics of the novel’, that is the through understanding the readers, the writers, and the moment of their writing/publication.

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About Matt Phillpott

I am an historian of early modern Britain and the Digital Resources Manager at the School of Advanced Study. My main area of interest is in the authentication of knowledge in early print, including religious, historical, and agricultural texts.

One thought on “Does the success of historical fiction benefit or threaten academic history? – Cora Kaplan

  1. Cora’s comment on how our perception of a novel changes based on the politics of the day was rather enlightening. I found this interesting because it made me think about how historical fiction provides us with an insight into society and the political atmosphere during the time the novel was written and published, despite the story itself taking place in the past. This thinking flowed into the banning of books, such as The Catcher In The Rye in U.S. schools during the 1980s, and the rationale behind such actions.

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